Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Author(s): Lantz, Catherine
  • Source:
    Library Journal. 2/15/2017, Vol. 142 Issue 3, p107-112. 3p. 1 Color Photograph.
  • Document Type:
    Book Review
  • Subject Terms:
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      LANTZ, C. Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River. Library Journal, [s. l.], v. 142, n. 3, p. 107–112, 2017. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 8 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Lantz C. Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River. Library Journal. 2017;142(3):107-112. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875. Accessed July 8, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Lantz C. Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River. Library Journal. 2017;142(3):107-112. Accessed July 8, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875
    • APA:
      Lantz, C. (2017). Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River. Library Journal, 142(3), 107–112.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Lantz, Catherine. 2017. “Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River.” Library Journal 142 (3): 107–12. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      Lantz, C. (2017) ‘Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River’, Library Journal, 142(3), pp. 107–112. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 8 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Lantz, C 2017, ‘Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River’, Library Journal, vol. 142, no. 3, pp. 107–112, viewed 8 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Lantz, Catherine. “Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River.” Library Journal, vol. 142, no. 3, Feb. 2017, pp. 107–112. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Lantz, Catherine. “Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River.” Library Journal 142, no. 3 (February 15, 2017): 107–12. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Lantz C. Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River. Library Journal [Internet]. 2017 Feb 15 [cited 2020 Jul 8];142(3):107–12. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=121212927&custid=s3443875

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2017 March #1

Although considerably shorter than the nation's longest river, the Missouri, and much narrower in most spots than the mighty Mississippi, the Colorado River nonetheless rivals the other two in the number of states it crosses and the amount of people served by its circuitously flowing waters. Often referred to as "the American Nile" for its multiple uses and the indelible marks it has carved into the southwestern landscape, including the Grand Canyon, the Colorado River captivated New Yorker staff writer Owen (The Conundrum, 2012) enough over the years to inspire this eloquent survey of the waterway's geography and its many impacts on nearby life. Interweaving descriptions from his own explorations of the river on the ground and in the air, Owen offers a wealth of engrossing and often surprising details about the complicated nature of water rights, recreational usage (worth $26 billion a year), and depletion threats from climate change and the fracking industry. With water shortages looming across the globe, Owen's work provides invaluable lessons on the rewards and pitfalls involved in managing an essential natural resource. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2016 November #1

The Colorado River supplies water to 36 million people and six million acres of farmland, and its historically lush delta wetlands are now desert. Water issues in the American West are thus complicated, as they're deeply bound up with a human environment. From New Yorker staff writer Owen (Green Metropolis).. Copyright 2016 Library Journal.

LJ Reviews 2017 February #2

New Yorker staff writer Owen (The Conundrum; Green Metropolis) tackles the twisted history of the Colorado River. Water rights drafted in the gold rush era and formalized on miscalculations in the early 20th century are still controversial today. Farmers, businesses, cities, states, and Mexico clash over a water supply constantly decreasing as a result of changes in weather and population. The author includes the exploration and development history of the waterway and biographies of legendary figures such as John Wesley Powell, who led a three-month expedition down the Green and Colorado rivers, and riverboat pilot Nellie Bush. Owen travels the length of the Colorado from the headwaters to the delta (now dry) by plane, by car, and on foot, talking to stakeholders about their issues. This purposefully rambling narrative frames the discussion of water as a vital continental concern. VERDICT An essential read for not only the environmentally minded but also all citizens who are curious about where their water comes from. Highly recommended for public, school, and academic libraries. [Prepub Alert, 10/10/15.]—Catherine Lantz, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago Lib.

Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2017 February #4

The Colorado River, the main water source of America's desert Southwest, flows sorely vexed to the sea—almost—in this revealing investigation of hydroecology in extremis. New Yorker contributor Owen (The Conundrum) follows the Colorado from its Rocky Mountain headwaters to the point where it trickles out in the Mexican desert, well short of its historical outlet to the sea, visiting the massive infrastructures—the mighty Hoover Dam, giant pipes, pumping stations, canals, and humble sprinklers—that divert its waters for millions of uses. Along the way he encounters people whose lives entwine with the river, including lawyers wrangling endlessly over arbitrary apportionment rules—existing allotments grant various users more water than actually flows in the river—and utility planners trying to stretch the flow among a growing population, as well as ordinary farmers, boaters, and the quirky subculture of transient RV camps on its banks. Through his reportage, Owen teases out the contradictions of the complex issues surrounding the Colorado: water conservation efforts, he finds, can do more harm than good because allegedly "wasted" water often returns to replenish the river and aquifers. Rather than simply bemoan environmental degradation, Owen presents a deeper, more useful analysis of the subtle interplay between natural and human needs. Agent: David McCormick, McCormick Literary. (Apr.)

Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.