The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty.

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  • Source:
    Library Journal. Winter2019, Vol. 144 Issue 12, p81-81. 1/9p.
  • Document Type:
    Book Review
  • Subject Terms:
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty. Library Journal, [s. l.], v. 144, n. 12, p. 81, 2019. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 21 fev. 2020.
    • AMA:
      The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty. Library Journal. 2019;144(12):81. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875. Accessed February 21, 2020.
    • APA:
      The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty. (2019). Library Journal, 144(12), 81.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      “The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty.” 2019. Library Journal 144 (12): 81. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      ‘The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty’ (2019) Library Journal, 144(12), p. 81. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 21 February 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      ‘The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty’ 2019, Library Journal, vol. 144, no. 12, p. 81, viewed 21 February 2020, .
    • MLA:
      “The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty.” Library Journal, vol. 144, no. 12, Dec. 2019, p. 81. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      “The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty.” Library Journal 144, no. 12 (December 15, 2019): 81. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty. Library Journal [Internet]. 2019 Dec 15 [cited 2020 Feb 21];144(12):81. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=140328781&custid=s3443875

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2019 May

Page, Washington correspondent for USA Today, tackles the life of former first lady Barbara Bush (1925–2018) in this new biography. While the work is not officially authorized, Page interviewed Bush many times before her death in 2018 and had access to her voluminous diaries that no other historian has seen. Page's coverage includes key moments, such as her marriage to George Bush, the death of her daughter Robin, her struggles with depression, the development of her own political consciousness, and her contentious relationship with Nancy Reagan. While the Bushes' marriage is often held up as an ideal one, Page concludes that the long-rumored affair that George Bush had with aide Jennifer Fitzgerald was likely true, even though both always denied it. The author spends considerable time analyzing Barbara Bush's personality, including her quick wit, bluntness, self-deprecation, loyalty to her husband, and strict methods for raising her children and grandchildren; all traits that captivated the public. VERDICT An engaging read full of rich behind-the-scenes details of a fascinating matriarch and public leader, including her struggles and triumphs.—Kate Stewart, Arizona Historical Soc., Tuscon

Copyright 2019 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2019 April #1

The recently deceased wife of President George H. W. Bush and mother of President George W. Bush exemplifies an old-school style of feminine strength and influence in this warmhearted biography. USA Today Washington bureau chief Page paints Bush (1925-2018), possibly the last First Lady to have had no career, as a sometimes controversial icon of postwar wifely devotion, gamely uprooting herself from her affluent New England home to a chancy new life in Texas and being a full-time (and occasionally depressed) mom to six children—her daughter's death from leukemia is a moving centerpiece of the narrative—to accommodate her husband's ambitions. But she was also a canny political animal, Page contends. She persuaded her vacillating husband to go negative with racially tinged campaign ads against Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential election, and asked her son pointed questions about the invasion of Iraq; in her own right, she forcefully advocated for literacy programs and opposed discrimination against AIDS patients. There's little drama in Bush's story apart from tension between her and Nancy Reagan, and the author's assessment of her as indispensable to her husband's political rise feels overstated. But Bush admirers will enjoy Page's vivid depiction of her as an appealing, down-to-earth, sharp-tongued figure who held her own in a man's world. (Apr.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.