Ecology of a Cracker childhood / Janisse Ray.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      1st ed.
    • Notes:
      University of Alberta copy in the Schloss Collection of Modern Literature.
      38
    • ISBN:
      157131234X (hardcover : alk. paper)
    • Accession Number:
      99013403
    • Accession Number:
      neos.2551608
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      RAY, J. Ecology of a Cracker childhood. 1st ed. [s. l.]: Milkweed Editions, 1999. ISBN 157131234X. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 27 maio. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Ray J. Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. 1st ed. Milkweed Editions; 1999. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875. Accessed May 27, 2020.
    • APA:
      Ray, J. (1999). Ecology of a Cracker childhood (1st ed.). Milkweed Editions.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Ray, Janisse. 1999. Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. 1st ed. Milkweed Editions. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      Ray, J. (1999) Ecology of a Cracker childhood. 1st ed. Milkweed Editions. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 27 May 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Ray, J 1999, Ecology of a Cracker childhood, 1st ed., Milkweed Editions, viewed 27 May 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Ray, Janisse. Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. 1st ed., Milkweed Editions, 1999. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Ray, Janisse. Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. 1st ed. Milkweed Editions, 1999. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Ray J. Ecology of a Cracker childhood [Internet]. 1st ed. Milkweed Editions; 1999 [cited 2020 May 27]. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=cat06118a&AN=neos.2551608&custid=s3443875

Reviews

Booklist Monthly Selections - #1 November 1999

Even though the vast and now legendary longleaf pine forests that once covered south Georgia had been cut down before she was born, Ray feels as though she has walked within their green filtered light. This knowledge must be genetic, she muses, since her clannish people, called crackers, have lived on this flat and sun-pressed land for 180 years. She explores the complex connection between earth and blood in a spellbinding memoir that entwines family, cultural, and natural history. A tomboy in spite of her strict Apostolic upbringing, Ray always loved the outdoors, although her surroundings were hardly pristine: her family lived in a junkyard and made their modest livelihood as scavengers. Ray describes the junkyard games she and her siblings played and recounts riveting stories from her grandparents' and parents' demanding lives, tales of colossal physical strength, towering faith, unfailing love, and, sadly, mental illness. Ray compares human dramas to the lives of plants and animals and ponders our habits of both abusing nature and praising its beauty. ((Reviewed November 1, 1999)) Copyright 2000 Booklist Reviews

LJ Reviews 2000 November #2

If this book is social history, why does it also read like natural history? Seemingly, that's the point Ray, a naturalist and environmental activist, hopes to make: that she is a product of her environment and therefore tied to it. Through alternating chapters, the author presents a biography of herself and her family and discussion of the longleaf pine tree community of the South (mainly Florida and Georgia). The family stories reveal poverty, strict parental and religious prohibitions, tough discipline, and a family history of mental illness. Writing these stories seems to have been cathartic for Ray, helping her understand why family members acted and believed as they did. Her natural history chapters describe the decline of the longleaf pine forest ecosystem, detailing the damage that fire suppression and relentless logging cause, the fate of endangered species, and the connection that Ray feels with the land. Readers from the region, from a similarly impoverished background, or who are interested in the Southern pine forests will appreciate this book. Recommended for large public libraries. Nancy J. Moeckel, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

LJ Reviews 1999 November #2

If this book is social history, why does it also read like natural history? Seemingly, that's the point Ray, a naturalist and environmental activist, hopes to make: that she is a product of her environment and therefore tied to it. Through alternating chapters, the author presents a biography of herself and her family and discussion of the longleaf pine tree community of the South (mainly Florida and Georgia). The family stories reveal poverty, strict parental and religious prohibitions, tough discipline, and a family history of mental illness. Writing these stories seems to have been cathartic for Ray, helping her understand why family members acted and believed as they did. Her natural history chapters describe the decline of the longleaf pine forest ecosystem, detailing the damage that fire suppression and relentless logging cause, the fate of endangered species, and the connection that Ray feels with the land. Readers from the region, from a similarly impoverished background, or who are interested in the Southern pine forests will appreciate this book. Recommended for large public libraries.ANancy J. Moeckel, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

PW Reviews 1999 October #3

Ray, a poet and an environmental activist, takes a tough-minded look at life in rural southern Georgia in this blend of memoir and nature study. She presents detailed observations of her family members, most notably her grandfather Charlie, who was "terrifying, prone to violent and unmerited punishment"; her father, whose decision to buy a tract of land near Highway 1 and turn it into what became a massive junkyard with a house in the middle set in motion the key events in Ray's life; and her mother, whose total devotion to her family was tested when her husband began a three-year bout with mental illness. Interspersed with these portraits are various chapters describing the beauty of the longleaf pine flatwoods and other natural treasures found, and often endangered, in her home state. Ray's writing is at its best when she recalls her most harrowing memories, such as when her father gave her and her two brothers a whipping after they stood by and watched a friend kill a turtle. These scenes resonate during the interpolated naturalist chapters, which evoke the calm of the landscape and give readers a respite from the anger and pain that drive much of the family narrative. In a final chapter (in which she includes appendixes on the specific endangered species of the South), Ray laments the "daily erosion of unique folkways as our native ecosystems and all their inhabitants disappear." What remains most memorable are the sections where Ray describes, and attempts to prevent, her own disconnection from the Georgia landscape. (Nov.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.