The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      American Library Association
    • Publication Date:
      2019
    • Abstract:
      * The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. By Mona Eltahawy. Sept. 2019. 208p. Beacon, $24.95 (9780807013816). 305.42. Feminist activist Eltahawy (Headscarves and Hymens, 2015) returns with [...]
    • ISSN:
      0006-7385
    • Rights:
      COPYRIGHT 2019 American Library Association
      Copyright 2019 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.598305071
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      EATHORNE, C. The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. Booklist, [s. l.], v. 115, n. 22, p. 8, 2019. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 8 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Eathorne C. The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. Booklist. 2019;115(22):8. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875. Accessed July 8, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Eathorne C. The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. Booklist. 2019;115(22):8. Accessed July 8, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875
    • APA:
      Eathorne, C. (2019, August 1). The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. Booklist, 115(22), 8.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Eathorne, Courtney. 2019. “The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls.” Booklist, August 1. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      Eathorne, C. (2019) ‘The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls’, Booklist, 1 August, p. 8. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 8 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Eathorne, C 2019, ‘The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls’, Booklist, vol. 115, no. 22, p. 8, viewed 8 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Eathorne, Courtney. “The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls.” Booklist, vol. 115, no. 22, Aug. 2019, p. 8. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Eathorne, Courtney. “The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls.” Booklist, August 1, 2019. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Eathorne C. The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls. Booklist [Internet]. 2019 Aug 1 [cited 2020 Jul 8];115(22):8. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.598305071&custid=s3443875

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1

*Starred Review* Feminist activist Eltahawy (Headscarves and Hymens, 2015) returns with a sharp manifesto for fighting the patriarchy. She presents seven "sins" for female and nonbinary readers to use for disrupting the social systems keeping them down: anger, attention, profanity, ambition, power, violence, and lust. These seven behaviors, Eltahawy argues, have kept men in positions of authority for too long. When women and girls take these sins for themselves, there is no telling how quickly the trifecta of patriarchy (at state, street, and home levels) will crumble. Eltahawy uses examples of "sinning" female figures from all over the globe to convey how defiant behavior drives change: U.S. Congresswomen Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, Mexican American poet Erika L. Sánchez, Ugandan scholar Stella Nyanzi, and Saudi Arabian refugee Rahaf Mohammed, among others. In her introduction, Eltahawy shares the spark behind this book; at 15, she was sexually assaulted during her pilgrimage to Mecca. When, at age 50, Eltahawy was groped on a dance-club floor in Montreal, with all of the anger from her first attack coursing through her veins, she beat her attacker to the floor. That night, Eltahawy learned that there is no time or space for feminism that doesn't terrify men. Brilliant and electrifying. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews 2019 August #1

*Starred Review* Feminist activist Eltahawy (Headscarves and Hymens, 2015) returns with a sharp manifesto for fighting the patriarchy. She presents seven "sins" for female and nonbinary readers to use for disrupting the social systems keeping them down: anger, attention, profanity, ambition, power, violence, and lust. These seven behaviors, Eltahawy argues, have kept men in positions of authority for too long. When women and girls take these sins for themselves, there is no telling how quickly the trifecta of patriarchy (at state, street, and home levels) will crumble. Eltahawy uses examples of "sinning" female figures from all over the globe to convey how defiant behavior drives change: U.S. Congresswomen Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, Mexican American poet Erika L. Sánchez, Ugandan scholar Stella Nyanzi, and Saudi Arabian refugee Rahaf Mohammed, among others. In her introduction, Eltahawy shares the spark behind this book; at 15, she was sexually assaulted during her pilgrimage to Mecca. When, at age 50, Eltahawy was groped on a dance-club floor in Montreal, with all of the anger from her first attack coursing through her veins, she beat her attacker to the floor. That night, Eltahawy learned that there is no time or space for feminism that doesn't terrify men. Brilliant and electrifying. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2019 July #1

In this fed-up, rage-fueled "big fuck-you to the patriarchy," activist and journalist Eltahawy (Headscarves and Hymens) thrusts "tools to fight back" into the hands of women and girls: in themed chapters, Eltahawy exhorts her peers to embrace their power through the energy of anger, attention seeking, profanity, ambition, power, violence, and lust. She lets no one off the hook, calling out the Muslims who defended the man who sexually assaulted her while she was on hajj and the racist Americans who vilified Muslim men during her #mosquemetoo response, feminists who accept the crumbs offered to them by the patriarchy and promote milquetoast ideas of "girl power," U.S. Republican white women complicit in misogyny and racism, and women who call for civility in discourse or who disavow violent responses to violence. But Eltahawy's arguments come through with as much intelligence and clarity as passion and evocative imagery; they are built on facts about racism, capitalism, and homophobia, as well as her own and others' experiences. Eltahawy not only gives frustrated women permission, but demands that they "defy, disobey, and disrupt." This bold, rampaging manifesto is far past the edge of mainstream feminism, but it's so viscerally motivational that even those more moderately inclined may find themselves intrigued. (Sept.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.