The Lost Book of Adana Moreau

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      American Library Association
    • Publication Date:
      2020
    • Abstract:
      * The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. By Michael Zapata. Feb. 2020. 272p. Hanover Square, $26.99 (9781335010124). In a lyrical tale spanning a century and veering from the [...]
    • ISSN:
      0006-7385
    • Rights:
      COPYRIGHT 2020 American Library Association
      Copyright 2020 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.613202886
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      WILLIAMS, L. The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. Booklist, [s. l.], v. 116, n. 9–10, p. 37, 2020. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 13 ago. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Williams L. The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. Booklist. 2020;116(9-10):37. Accessed August 13, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875
    • APA:
      Williams, L. (2020, January 1). The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. Booklist, 116(9–10), 37.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Williams, Lesley. 2020. “The Lost Book of Adana Moreau.” Booklist, January 1. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      Williams, L. (2020) ‘The Lost Book of Adana Moreau’, Booklist, 1 January, p. 37. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 13 August 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Williams, L 2020, ‘The Lost Book of Adana Moreau’, Booklist, vol. 116, no. 9–10, p. 37, viewed 13 August 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Williams, Lesley. “The Lost Book of Adana Moreau.” Booklist, vol. 116, no. 9–10, Jan. 2020, p. 37. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Williams, Lesley. “The Lost Book of Adana Moreau.” Booklist, January 1, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Williams L. The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. Booklist [Internet]. 2020 Jan 1 [cited 2020 Aug 13];116(9–10):37. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.613202886&custid=s3443875

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1

*Starred Review* In a lyrical tale spanning a century and veering from the colonized Caribbean to revolutionary Russia, from mid-twentieth-century Chicago to Katrina-besieged New Orleans, Zapata spins an iridescent web of grief, loss, and memory. Maxwell Moreau, offspring of Adana, a brilliant Dominican writer, and a father he knows as "the last pirate," grows to adolescence deprived of both parents but entranced by the tales his mother once recounted in her glorious novel of alternate realities, Lost City. More than a half-century later, another orphaned boy, Saul, discovers a mysterious manuscript among his deceased grandfather's belongings, addressed to a famous theoretical physicist, Maxwell Moreau. The connection between Saul and Maxwell, and the role Adana's novel plays in both their lives constitute an enchanting blend of history, science, and fairy tale. Zapata's unforgettable characters lose loved ones, countries, and even identities, but they preserve "lost worlds" in the stories they tell and by "reading the night sky." Maxwell and Saul realize that history and science alone are insufficient to describe the myriad possibilities of human existence. "History," Saul observes, "like fiction was illusory, if not an outright lie, but we still existed because of it and it existed because of us". A lush, spellbinding tale. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

Booklist Reviews 2020 January #1

*Starred Review* In a lyrical tale spanning a century and veering from the colonized Caribbean to revolutionary Russia, from mid-twentieth-century Chicago to Katrina-besieged New Orleans, Zapata spins an iridescent web of grief, loss, and memory. Maxwell Moreau, offspring of Adana, a brilliant Dominican writer, and a father he knows as "the last pirate," grows to adolescence deprived of both parents but entranced by the tales his mother once recounted in her glorious novel of alternate realities, Lost City. More than a half-century later, another orphaned boy, Saul, discovers a mysterious manuscript among his deceased grandfather's belongings, addressed to a famous theoretical physicist, Maxwell Moreau. The connection between Saul and Maxwell, and the role Adana's novel plays in both their lives constitute an enchanting blend of history, science, and fairy tale. Zapata's unforgettable characters lose loved ones, countries, and even identities, but they preserve "lost worlds" in the stories they tell and by "reading the night sky." Maxwell and Saul realize that history and science alone are insufficient to describe the myriad possibilities of human existence. "History," Saul observes, "like fiction was illusory, if not an outright lie, but we still existed because of it and it existed because of us". A lush, spellbinding tale. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2020 February

DEBUT In this labyrinthine debut novel about story's power to traverse time and space, the sf-loving Saul Drower hopes to fulfill his grandfather's dying wish—return a massive manuscript to Maxwell Moreau. But when the envelope is returned unopened, he embarks on a rabbit-hole journey with his investigative reporter best friend that takes them to the stricken post-Katrina New Orleans. Along the way, Saul uncovers his own family's secrets. Zapata unfolds the mystery of the manuscript's origins, and readers will be mesmerized by the unraveling of how the protagonists' lives interconnect. The author develops each of the characters with nuance—from Dominican immigrant Adana Moreau, the book's author; to her husband, the Last Pirate in the world; and to their son Max, an astrophysicist bent on proving the existence of the multiverse. The story-within-a-story structure might lose some, especially as the sections alternate through the decade. However, patient readers will be rewarded with an illuminating work on trauma and the transience of human existence. Echoes of authors from the Latin American Boom movement and traces of H.G. Wells combine to create a fascinating send up to science fiction. VERDICT A heady literary and genre-bending novel for fans of Jorge Luis Borges, Carlos Fuentes, and Adolfo Bioy Caseres.—Shelley M. Diaz, BookOps, New York P.L. and Brooklyn P.L.

Copyright 2020 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2019 October #2

In Zapata's stirring debut, a man's efforts to fulfill his grandfather's last wishes leads him into the horror of post-Katrina New Orleans. On the eve of the Great Depression, Dominican expat novelist Adana Moreau finishes then destroys the sequel to her masterwork, Lost City. After her death, Adana's 10 year-old, mixed-race son, Maxwell, is alone and adrift in New Orleans. A generation later in Chicago, Saul Drower discovers an unpublished manuscript in a box that his late grandfather requested be sent to now-renowned physicist Maxwell Moreau. Saul's efforts to locate the elusive academic lead him to New Orleans just as Hurricane Katrina makes landfall. Joined by his childhood friend, Saul dives deep into the flooded city. Zapata expertly jumps between the story of Maxwell 's youth and Saul's attempt to return his manuscript. Histories collide as Saul navigates the storm-battered city in search of Maxwell and the prophetic words of Adana become realized. Zapata expertly blends the drama of the lost manuscript with the on-the-ground chaos and tumult caused by the storm. Digging into themes of regeneration and rejuvenation, Zapata's marriage of speculative and realist styles makes for a harrowing, immersive tale that will appeal to fans of Jesmyn Ward's Salvage the Bones. (Feb.)

Copyright 2019 Publishers Weekly.