Pizza Girl

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      American Library Association
    • Publication Date:
      2020
    • Abstract:
      Pizza Girl. By Jean Kyoung Frazier. June 2020. 208p. Doubleday. $24.95 (9780385545723). The title character and narrator of Frazier's quirky and emotionally resonant L.A.-set debut doesn't love her [...]
    • ISSN:
      0006-7385
    • Rights:
      COPYRIGHT 2020 American Library Association
      Copyright 2020 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.623790568
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BOSTROM, A. Pizza Girl. Booklist, [s. l.], v. 116, n. 17, p. 23, 2020. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875. Acesso em: 19 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Bostrom A. Pizza Girl. Booklist. 2020;116(17):23. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875
    • APA:
      Bostrom, A. (2020, May 1). Pizza Girl. Booklist, 116(17), 23.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Bostrom, Annie. 2020. “Pizza Girl.” Booklist, May 1. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875.
    • Harvard:
      Bostrom, A. (2020) ‘Pizza Girl’, Booklist, 1 May, p. 23. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875 (Accessed: 19 September 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Bostrom, A 2020, ‘Pizza Girl’, Booklist, vol. 116, no. 17, p. 23, viewed 19 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Bostrom, Annie. “Pizza Girl.” Booklist, vol. 116, no. 17, May 2020, p. 23. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Bostrom, Annie. “Pizza Girl.” Booklist, May 1, 2020. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Bostrom A. Pizza Girl. Booklist [Internet]. 2020 May 1 [cited 2020 Sep 19];116(17):23. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.623790568&custid=s3443875

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2020 May #1

The title character and narrator of Frazier's quirky and emotionally resonant L.A.-set debut doesn't love her pizza-delivery job, but, 18 and pregnant, she doesn't see a ton of other options. She's not thrilled about the baby either, but her boyfriend, Billy, and her mom make up for the excitement she lacks. From the moment she fields an order from Jenny, a woman desperate to please her young son with a pepperoni-and-pickle pizza, she finds an object for her devotion. Soon, Jenny convinces her to attend a moms' group, held in the same church where she and Billy first connected in grief counseling. With the loving, fully dimensional characters Frazier props up around her, Pizza Girl is bottled up and confused, her erratic behavior becoming cruel and worse. With readers, though, she's her full-hearted, idiosyncratic self. She fears she's too much like her late, alcoholic dad and wonders if her mom felt a similar ambivalence surrounding her own birth. Fans of Miranda July, Patty Yumi Cottrell, and Jen Beagin will find a kindred heroine in Frazier's Pizza Girl. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2020 February #3

In Frazier's playful and unflinching debut, a pregnant 18-year-old pizza delivery driver dreams of a new life. The unnamed narrator, overwhelmed by anxiety about her pregnancy and her family, wants out of the house she grew up in, where she lives with her mother and her boyfriend, Billy, in suburban L.A. Enter Jenny Hauser, a 39-year-old stay-at-home mother who orders a large with pepperoni and pickles for her fussy son. From the moment Jenny opens her door, the narrator nurses a dream of escaping with her ("I wanted to take her hand and invite her to come with me whenever I ran away"). The narrator comes to befriend Jenny and learns she is unhappy in her marriage; thinking of how her dead father abused her mother, she assumes Jenny is abused as well. At home, the narrator turns cold toward Billy and her mother, and embraces her isolation the way her deceased abusive father once did, by turning to alcohol. Her frequent intoxication colors her view of her relationship with Jenny, whom she manages to kiss once and makes a valiant but dangerous and unnecessary effort to rescue. Frazier's characters are raw and her dialogue startlingly observant ("The environment can suck a dick—I'm driving my F-150 to work again," one regular tells her). This infectious evocation of a young woman's slackerdom will appeal to fans of Halle Butler and Ottessa Moshfegh, and will make it difficult not to root for the troubled and spirited pizza girl. (Jun.)

Copyright 2020 Publishers Weekly.

PW Reviews 2020 February #3

In Frazier's playful and unflinching debut, a pregnant 18-year-old pizza delivery driver dreams of a new life. The unnamed narrator, overwhelmed by anxiety about her pregnancy and her family, wants out of the house she grew up in, where she lives with her mother and her boyfriend, Billy, in suburban L.A. Enter Jenny Hauser, a 39-year-old stay-at-home mother who orders a large with pepperoni and pickles for her fussy son. From the moment Jenny opens her door, the narrator nurses a dream of escaping with her ("I wanted to take her hand and invite her to come with me whenever I ran away"). The narrator comes to befriend Jenny and learns she is unhappy in her marriage; thinking of how her dead father abused her mother, she assumes Jenny is abused as well. At home, the narrator turns cold toward Billy and her mother, and embraces her isolation the way her deceased abusive father once did, by turning to alcohol. Her frequent intoxication colors her view of her relationship with Jenny, whom she manages to kiss once and makes a valiant but dangerous and unnecessary effort to rescue. Frazier's characters are raw and her dialogue startlingly observant ("The environment can suck a dick—I'm driving my F-150 to work again," one regular tells her). This infectious evocation of a young woman's slackerdom will appeal to fans of Halle Butler and Ottessa Moshfegh, and will make it difficult not to root for the troubled and spirited pizza girl. (Jun.)

Copyright 2020 Publishers Weekly.